Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Bangladeshi-British remanded in London over plot to kill UK PM Theresa May

  • News Desk, bdnews24.com
    Published: 2017-12-06 22:58:52 BdST

bdnews24
File Photo: Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May meets Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy at 10 Downing Street, London, Dec 5, 2017. Reuters

One of the two men remanded over a plot to assassinate British Prime Minister Theresa May has introduced himself as a Bangladeshi-British.

Naa'imur Zakariyah Rahman, 20, from north London, planned to detonate a homemade bomb and attack the May with a suicide vest and a knife, reports the BBC.

A second man also appeared in Westminster Magistrates' Court charged with preparing terrorist acts. Both men will appear at London's Old Bailey on Dec 20.

Rahman is charged with the preparation of terrorist acts and also with assisting another man to prepare separate acts of terrorism, according to the BBC report.

The second charge relates to allegedly helping Mohammad Aqib Imran, 21, a Pakistani-British from Birmingham, who is accused of preparing acts of terrorism.

He is alleged to have taken several steps in an attempt to travel to Libya.

That included saving money, trying to secure a false passport, and researching extremist ideologies and travel options.

The duo were arrested by Metropolitan Police officers on Nov 28 within 90 minutes of one another.

During the seven-minute hearing, the men - dressed in light grey sweatshirts and trousers - confirmed their names, addresses and dates of birth.

Rahman gave his nationality as Bangladeshi-British, while Imran gave his as Pakistani-British.

Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot remanded the men in custody ahead of the Old Bailey appearance.

The Metropolitan Police told Reuters on Tuesday that two men arrested last week had been charged with terrorism offences and would appear in Westminster Magistrates' Court on Wednesday.

Sky News reported on Tuesday, citing sources, that police had foiled a plot to assassinate Prime Minister May.

The report said police believed there was a plan to launch an improvised explosive device at Downing Street and, in the chaos that ensued, attack and kill May.