Nature reclaims public spaces during coronavirus lockdowns around the world

Fox cubs venture out from their den under a popular boardwalk alongside Lake Ontario in Toronto, Ontario, Canada April 22, 2020. REUTERS
With billions of people staying at home and almost no vehicles on streets or workers at factories due to the coronavirus pandemic, Nature has reclaimed its spots with greeneries growing at and creatures both wild and domesticated moving into developed spaces that are now empty amid lockdowns around the world.
Grass grows on Rome's popular Piazza Navona square after a huge drop in the number of visitors in Rome, Italy, April 9, 2020. REUTERS
A red fox stands at an empty parking lot in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon, April 20, 2020. REUTERS
A dog and a red fox run around an empty skate park in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon, April 19, 2020. REUTERS
Goats are seen outside a church in Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. A herd of Kashmir goats invaded the Welsh seaside resort after the coronavirus lockdown left the streets deserted. REUTERS
Blossomed vegetation is seen in a public park in Khiam, Lebanon April 22, 2020. REUTERS
A man feeds deer in Harold Hill housing estate in Romford, Britain, April 3, 2020. REUTERS
A red-tailed hawk feasts on a pigeon in the Sheep Meadow of Central Park with the skyline of midtown Manhattan in the background in New York City, March 25, 2020. REUTERS
Newly hatched babies leatherback sea turtles make their way into the sea for the first time at a beach in Phanga Nga district, Thailand, March 27, 2020. Thailand has found the largest number of leatherback nests in two decades on Newly hatched babies leatherback sea turtles make their way into the sea for the first time at a beach in Phanga Nga district, Thailand, March 27, 2020. Thailand has found the largest number of leatherback nests in two decades on beaches bereft of tourists, environmentalists say. The 11 turtle nests authorities have found since last November were the highest number in 20 years, said Kongkiat Kittiwatanawong, the director of the Phuket Marine Biological Center. "This is a very good sign for us because many areas for spawn have been destroyed by humans," he told Reuters. No such nests had been found for the previous five years. REUTERS/Mongkhonsawat Leungvorapanmany areas for spawning have been destroyed by humans," he told Reuters. No such nests had been found for the previous five years. REUTERS
A red fox stands in an empty park in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon, April 19, 2020. REUTERS